Join us in the search for Free Energy. Share your experiments and discoveries, post your build logs, and discuss.

We have a strict No-Troll policy. So you can post without fear of being ridiculed.

New Members- Check Your Spam Folder For Activation Link

Please read our Rules. Any problems or suggestions- Contact Us

 

Other Overunity Forums:

Overunity Machines   ||   Overunity Research



Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Neutralizing The Gate.... Video by Jim Mac
#51
had the same idea using many iron plates instead of bolts. The way I see it is, it is better to have the magnets that polarize the bolts be as close to the inner diameter of the rotor as possible, where the outer influence on the polarized bolts has more leverage on the outer edge of the wheel than the magnets on the close inner diameter side of the bolts. should help reduce cogging there.  My design with many plates should ease the inner cogging as there will be only one plate at a time entering the inner magnets field as one exits, while all the other plates are polarized in between the entering plate and exiting plate. maybe some arc magnets could be helpful..

Mags
Reply
#52
(05-26-2024, 10:52 PM)magluvin Wrote: had the same idea using many iron plates instead of bolts. The way I see it is, it is better to have the magnets that polarize the bolts be as close to the inner diameter of the rotor as possible, where the outer influence on the polarized bolts has more leverage on the outer edge of the wheel than the magnets on the close inner diameter side of the bolts. should help reduce cogging there.  My design with many plates should ease the inner cogging as there will be only one plate at a time entering the inner magnets field as one exits, while all the other plates are polarized in between the entering plate and exiting plate. maybe some arc magnets could be helpful..

Mags

Yeah, if you look back a few posts, I have a model using arc magnets on the inside. It magnetized decently but cogged like a Bi@tch.

You can see the problem I am facing with my demonstration here in the video below.  If this can be solved, I think it will go

Reply
#53
I have just embodied part of my drawing that demonstrates that the principle works. Manually moving the attracting magnets apart lets the repelling magnets separate which is the free work done and then letting go of the attracting magnets then attracts back and realigns the repelling magnets for a repeat cycle.

Next I need to complete the remaining balancing magnets so the switching is effortless. Then comes the hardest part - the clockwork to do the switching....That is where I have always failed.

There you have it for no extra charge.

Norman
Reply
#54
I have a few of these motorcycle rotors. Nice strong magnets evenly placed.

   

I plan to try making a ferromagnetic rotor that rotates inside here.  I will see if I can come up with a design that has minimal cogging.  Then go from there.
Reply
#55
Do you need the metal housing of the rotor to allow the magnetic feild to be contained in the housing? A thought is weaking the feild of the housing by cutting windows between the magnets as in the Kromrey generator. Do one as shown and another with windows? Just a thought.
Reply
#56
(05-31-2024, 11:34 AM)Uniongarage Wrote: Do you need the metal housing of the rotor to allow the magnetic feild to be contained in the housing?                          A thought is weaking the feild of the housing by cutting windows between the magnets as in the Kromrey generator. Do one as shown and another with windows?  Just a thought.

Not sure what I need or what will work best.  All I know is I have these nice rotors that have arc magnets installed. Don't really want to start cutting them. I figure, the stringer the field, the better, as it will magnetize the ferromagnetic material the most.

Designing the bearing holders and mounting stands is a pita. I want everything aligned as good as possible, so we are talking fractions of a millimeter.  And the stupid mounting holes won't align with whole # measurements.
Reply
#57
I know you already have them , a alternative cheap source of a set up like what you have is radiator fan motors out of cars. The shaft size is a lot smaller and would be easier to mount on a small bearing or bushing. I come across all sorts of different dc motors working on cars with permanent magnets. Are you near any You pull it salvage yards ? They are treasure chest of cheap parts for experiments. Good Luck ! Let me know if there is any specifics of type of rotor or stator references I could help source related to automotive.
Reply
#58
(05-31-2024, 02:04 PM)Uniongarage Wrote: I know you already have them , a alternative cheap source of a set up like what you have is radiator fan motors out of cars. The shaft size is a lot smaller and would be easier to mount on a small bearing or bushing. I come across all sorts of different dc motors working on cars with permanent magnets. Are you near any You pull it salvage yards ? They are treasure chest of cheap parts for experiments. Good Luck ! Let me know if there is any specifics of type of rotor or stator references I could help source related to automotive.

Thanks man. There is a few scrap yards, but for the effort, this thing costed me $19.  If it works and I need a pile of them, I may make the trip.  But if I go to a scrap yard, I will spend all day pulling as many as I can.

Update-  The cogging problem is practically eliminated!  As others suggested, the answer is staggering the bolts to magnets in such a way where when 1 pair is at the sticky spot, the other pair is at the pull-in spot.  

With 6 magnets,  if I use 2 bolts it Coggs like a MOFO.  But 6 magnets with 4 bolts- Smooth Sailing!  I need to try more combinations, but this is nice progress!



Here is the pattern:

   

Same basic concept as creating 90 degree phases.  When one is at peak, another is at zero. There are many more combinations that should work also.

Now to think about the stator.  Just using a magnet probably won't work. Although the bolts have no polarity at TDC, a stator magnet will attract to them and make a sticky spot.  I think I have to use a similar technique to turn the magnetic polarity On and Off in the stator magnet.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)