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Solid State "Infinity Looper"
#21
Impressive!

Is there a way this can be replicated without digital arduino?
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#22
Enhorabuena buena JIM, ya si hemos entendido la dinámica de flujo magnético originadas en un triplete Figuera, gracias al desarrollo realizado por ti a nivel de electrónica digital con arduino puedes estar muy contento y feliz de tú trabajo, yo lo conseguí a nivel analógico usando el conmutador Figuera, pero la teoría es la misma el signo de infinito

Congratulations good JIM, if we have understood the dynamics of magnetic flux originating in a Figuera triplet, thanks to the development carried out by you at the level of digital electronics with Arduino you can be very happy and happy with your work, I achieved it at an analog level using the Figuera switch, but the theory is the same the infinity sign
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#23
Really amazing!
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#24
wow! fantastic. thank you for your great work.
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#25
Thumbs Up 
(02-04-2024, 12:49 AM)ovun987 Wrote: Impressive!

Is there a way this can be replicated without digital arduino?

I believe so..  Single shaft with multiple commutators phased correctly should do it.  

1. Parallel split a DC source to create 2 phases 90 degrees apart with commutators. 
2. Isolate each phase through transformers and rectify each phase individually.  
3. Use those isolated DC outputs to once again make 2 new phases 90 degrees apart with additional commutators, but CROSS THE NEGATIVES between rectifiers (Picture how a Figure 8 crosses in the middle).
4. Both commutator setups need to be timed at the exact same time. Now we have 2 phases with 4 wires out which is powered by 2 isolated phases. 
5. Now connecting loads (inductors) between these phases and it eliminates (or even reverses) Lenz.  The CEMF now helps the sister phase because of the crossed grounds.

Essentially we made 2 circles, then crossed connected them in the middle (crossed grounds) thus making the full Figure 8. Now Adding resistance to the output makes the input RISE, while lowering resistance makes the input LOWER.  

Remember, Isolation is needed. The grounds become the input of the sister phase. and all phases need to be exactly 90 degrees separated.  360/4=90

Another way to look at it, you rotate the input, then rotate the output.  Then cross connect them in the middle.

(02-04-2024, 05:38 AM)Escumo Wrote: Congratulations good JIM, if we have understood the dynamics of magnetic flux originating in a Figuera triplet, thanks to the development carried out by you at the level of digital electronics with Arduino you can be very happy and happy with your work, I achieved it at an analog level using the Figuera switch, but the theory is the same the infinity sign

Thanks- I am not yet using any "triplets" or output coils yet.  But that's the next step.  The delivery system that powers the coils must be correct  before the use of output coils comes into play. I think this relates to how Figuera did it, but not exactly. I will try to post your videos in your thread today or tonight.

(02-04-2024, 06:13 AM)andy Wrote: Really amazing!

(02-04-2024, 06:19 AM)ks6000 Wrote: wow! fantastic. thank you for your great work.

Thanks Dudes.  But the celebration has to be delayed till I get it to loop with itself..  Hopefully coming soon!
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#26
Ok so now to improve the whole idea into sinusoidal waves instead of square waves, with precise control..

Signal generator, outputs isolated through audio 1:1 transformers, feeding 2 independent amps which are fed from 2 power sources.  Crossing grounds between the sources.

If I can get this right, it will allow me to use virtually any wave type, even arbitrary waves. I can easily isolate both amps and input signals, while keeping exact synchronization between the 2.

I just got two 12V deep cell batteries and I think I should have everything else.  Tomorrow night starts my weekend, so I will have updates soon

I may hit other snags, but this is the main idea.
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#27
Tonight I studied these amplifiers and performed a bunch of tests on them to figure out what I need to do.  What seemed to be a big problem may actually turn out to be a huge benefit.

The Problem-  These amps are not "linear amps", so the output sinewave amplitude is not exactly based on the input voltage only.  The volume knob controls the input sinewave amplitude.  If I leave this all the way up, the output clips and the sinewave has a flat top, unless the input voltage is high enough. And if I turn it down so it doesn't clip, then raising the input voltage does not affect the sinewave. So this seemed to pose a problem..

The Good Part-  Then I realized this could be a benefit.  It should tell me EXACTLY is the device is functioning like I hope it will.  And if it does, this "problem" no longer becomes a problem at all.  

So now I have a "marker" to watch.  (the clipping)..  So I am aiming for the voltage from the Reciprocal EMF return to the opposite battery in series, thus summing the voltages of the reciprocal and the battery voltage at the exact time when the opposite circuit needs the power.  So if this "Clipping" starts to round out like a proper sinewave top, it is verification that the summing process is indeed occurring. This "clipping" can also be used as a marker to evaluate if more power is circulated with higher frequency.  And finally, once we are up and running, this volume knob becomes a fine-tuner which can exactly balance the input with the signal input for maximum efficiency. 

I know this sounds all too confusing to the average reader. Once I verify this, I will write up a full report so it becomes clearer.
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#28
Great work Jim. I've been looking into how to do the exact same thing (I'll get started on the bench shortly). The idea of reciprocation I have long held as the key and ran into the same issue pulsing coils either side of a rotor - separate isolated ground. I'm aiming for a perpetual mechanical shaft, and what you've done electrically might be the solution.
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#29
(02-07-2024, 01:37 AM)unimmortal Wrote: Great work Jim. I've been looking into how to do the exact same thing (I'll get started on the bench shortly). The idea of reciprocation I have long held as the key and ran into the same issue pulsing coils either side of a rotor - separate isolated ground. I'm aiming for a perpetual mechanical shaft, and what you've done electrically might be the solution.

Thanks-  I have been working at this a while now, so here are some hints:

First, as you know, every action creates an equal and opposite reaction. In electromagnetism, this reaction is CEMF (or reciprocal induction).  This "reaction" keeps us under unity.

So we need to create 2 separate equal and opposite actions on different circuits, so now the equal and opposite reactions of each circuit can be utilized by the opposite circuit. 

Basically, the opposite reaction of an opposite circuit is EXACTLY what the first circuit needs to self sustain.  And I believe this can be accomplished by simply cross connecting the grounds.  But the circuit NEEDS 2 batteries, 1 battery for each circuit.

Capacitors do not work because they have DC blocking when positive voltage enters the negative.  And there are phase problems when using rectified AC from a transformer as a source.

See, if we rectify AC, the negative terminal of a FWBR creates a parallel path for the return current.  The current entering a FWBR's negative can either flow back into the secondary of a transformer (thus lowering the input current)  OR it can bypass that and series sum it's voltage by exiting the positive DC leg of the FWBR.  

We want the latter.  Sure lowering the input looks cool, but that's not what we want.  We want it to sum with the supply voltage to produce us more output.  And every time I tried with AC input, the negative from the opposite circuit ALWAYS chooses to go through the secondary and lower the input current.  But it "might" work if we can phase the input AC exactly perfect. 

But batteries are perfect.  They are designed to sum voltage when in series and provide no alternative paths EXCEPT to series.  But measurements get difficult.  Connect 2 batteries in series and close the loop into itself and anywhere you try to measure voltage will only show the voltage of 1 battery even though we know the voltage is doubled because they are in series. 

Now regarding the coils, the primary coils become the 2nd "battery" of each circuit.  And these coils are continually charged by the reciprocal CEMF of the secondary. 

This all sounds super confusing , I know.  But an alternator that uses physical motion does this naturally and is the very reason it can produce 20 times the output that is needed to sustain the magnetic field of the rotor.  The alternator has the innate ability to sum it's CEMF with the battery to increase the field of the rotor with regards to frequency. The quicker the alternator spins, the more CEMF is produced, which series connects through the battery to  amplify the magnetic field of the rotor. Thus raising output with frequency.

This can be done with no Motion and thus NO DRAG.  But the design is MUCH MORE than just establishing magnetic rotation..  The magnetic rotation has to be created in such a way that the CEMF (reciprocal induction) is able to sum with the input voltage at the exact time it is needed.  

Finally I did not explain why a transformer does not do this correctly.  but YES even a transformer SUMS the voltage, BUT that summing hurts us..  When the AC wave of the primary is trying to DECLINE, the battery voltage sums and puts out more potential when the wave is trying to reduce potential. So it fights against it's own decline.  

There is probably more to this I am not seeing yet. And this is all just my "Theories" at this point.  And YES the textbooks contradict my outlook, as do mainstream understandings.  My rebuke is,  show me in the textbooks where it explains why my input went DOWN by more than 70% when I short my outputs together.
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#30
Ok, so we're roughly up to the same spot. I've got complete separation between circuits (rechargeable battery for hall sensor, 12V rechargeable for power), what do you suggest to alter coil phase? 

I'll post my full setup in my bench later today so as not to confuse people here, but here is a simple schematic I'm working from. Red is DC, Blue is AC

   
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