Join us in the search for Free Energy. Share your experiments and discoveries, post your build logs, and discuss.
We have a strict No-Troll policy. So you can post without fear of being ridiculed.

New Members- Check Your Spam Folder For Activation Link

Please read our Rules. Any problems or suggestions- Contact Us


Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Adams Axial Circuitry
#1
Starting this thread for circuit design, creation, learning etc...

Here is a cut down version that I'm going to start testing with.

12V Battery(1) > Switched to bottom coil > Rectified to 12 Battery(2) > Switch to top coil > Recitifed back to 12V Battery(1) > Repeat

   

UGN3053 hall sensor (5V, 10ma draw)
5V Eneloop battery packs for hall sensor
NMOS/PFET for switching power

   
Reply
#2
Guess I should have read this before asking the question in your other thread.
Sorry about that.
Reply
#3
(02-08-2024, 04:35 AM)Shylo Wrote: Guess I should have read this before asking the question in your other thread.
Sorry about that.

All good. 

Both sets are pulsing now, alternating sides every 30°
I get 12 pulses from a revolution.
Reply
#4
I don't understand the purpose of the bridge rectifiers.
If I understand correctly your pulsing the coils with 12V DC so when the pulse is shut off you feed the collapse to the other battery?
Wouldn't two diodes be enough?
Reply
#5
(02-09-2024, 03:52 AM)Shylo Wrote: I don't understand the purpose of the bridge rectifiers.
If I understand correctly your pulsing the coils with 12V DC so when the pulse is shut off you feed the collapse to the other battery?
Wouldn't two diodes be enough?

Yeah ok - to clarify, I'm trying a few scenario's:

1. Pulse one set of coils with a battery or starting capacitor, the coil terminals are fed to a FWBR, which then feeds the second set of coils, the output of the second set of coils goes through it's own FWBR and is fed back to the first set of coils. No batteries or capacitors in the running circuit - utopia. Everything I've seen so far shows me this is completely achievable.

2. Pulse each set of coils with a separate battery and crossover the rectified EMF to the opposite batteries. This one is a bit harder and ties to the solid-state looper Jim Mac is working on.


... but just to confuse you even more Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images. , here is a shot of the coil sets. Because all 6 coils in one coil set are generating emf every 60deg, my little PFET transistor was getting smashed and had a big heating issue - I'm not using flyback diodes . After a lot of experimenting, I've put reverse biased shottky's at each of the 5 coil joins that I aggregate to a 3rd output from the coil. This way, the coils act as one with a pulse, and upon reversal they've got a quicker individual exit out of the coil set. But none of this works properly until you draw it with a load to use it, and that's what this bench is about.


   
Reply
#6
Well aren't the second set of coils considered a load?
Your trying to send the collapse of the first set of coils into the second set?
So the polarity of the pulse your sending to the second set has to match the polarity that is being induced by the rotor if not they will just cancel.
Definitely confused ?
Reply
#7
Yes, just as the second set considers the first set a load.
Yes, and it appears to work, although I see current usage go up slightly.
Possibly, I'm still thinking through the transform between the coils as it relates to polarity. With the rotor north up: the bottom coils will be north to attract oncoming south magnet, will reverse and become south. The rectified output will go to the top coil that will be south to attract oncoming north magnet, will reverse and become north, and repeat. So the flux game is strong, just a case of getting the 'phasing' correct at each step to satisfy the infinity loop I'm trying to setup......

I'll mention here that my setup probably won't work until I rewind the top coils the other direction - otherwise the pulse will look different, outside in V inside out, for pulse, reversal and field collapse.

Testing last night and the 12V battery was returning ~16VDC pulsing the bottom coil. Turning on the top coil driven from a second battery bumped the return up to ~20VDC. This is from a fairly sub-par setup with an unbalanced rotor. I'm aiming to get double the output v input so that the reciprocation won't leave either side short of what their original input is. I'm still working through the resistance v current ratio's that return high emf with low current, which largely comes down to tuning the hall sensor position... it's a dependency paradox!
Reply
#8
Why would you have to rewind the coils just undo the nut flip the coil now the winding is going the other way.
Reply
#9
Coil winding direction predetermines whether it's used against N or S. You can wire it to use either, but I need it wound as a demagnetiser.
Reply
#10
What does demagnetizer mean?
Disconnect the coil it is now demagnetized.
You can't turn off the PM's field.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)